Thirty Pieces Of Silver

Jerry C. Brewer

In Matthew 26 is recorded the account of the covenant Judas made with the Jewish leaders to betray the Lord for 30 pieces of silver. That amount was a general price for an injured slave. What could it buy? The betrayal of Jesus by Judas was not what Jesus was worth, but what Judas was worth. From time immemorial, men have been willing to sell their integrity and their souls for a small amount of money. Many still do, by stealing from an employer. What will they profit by selling their souls for a pittance? (Matt. 16:26). Those 30 pieces of silver ultimately became the price of a field to bury the dead (Matt. 27:6-8).

Thirty pieces of silver could not buy Christ from crucifixion unto death. Judas did not intend for his betrayal to lead to the Lord’s death (Matt. 27:3-5). Like all sinners, Judas gave little thought to the consequences of sin, thinking only of his own pleasure. The pleasures of sin bring horrible consequences, of which Moses was aware (Heb. 11:24-25).

The famous basketball player Magic Johnson lived a life of unbridled lust, enjoying the pleasures of sin and reaped the consequence of HIV. Alcoholics do begin drinking to end up in the gutter. They think only of momentary pleasures until, at last, it is too late. Sin always promises far more than it delivers (2 Pet. 2:19). It promises pleasure, but brings pain. It promises satisfaction, but brings want and poverty. It promises “the good life,” but brings only death (Rom: 6:23).

Thirty pieces of silver could not bring Judas peace of mind. Only the gospel of Jesus Christ can do that, even in the midst of all of our woes (Phil. 4:7). Judas’ remorse brought him to suicide. Two men committed sin the night Jesus was arrested—Judas and Peter. Judas hanged himself. Peter was remorseful and repented (Matt. 27:5; Matt. 26:69-75). Those 30 pieces of silver could not redeem Judas from eternal perdition (John 17:12).

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Author: Editor

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