Is Anything More Important Than Your Salvation? – Lee Moses

Lee Moses

Your financial security is not more important than your salvation. Based upon the way they live, it is clear that most American adults place financial security near, if not at, the very top of life’s priorities. While financial prudence is wise, and financial success gained through hard work to be applauded, there are matters far more important. “For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Matt. 16:26).

Your job/school responsibilities are not more important than your salvation. Responsibilities are an important part of life. They tend toward personal improvement. They help to bring order and purpose to our lives. They help us contribute to a larger good than ourselves.

Many people view their job responsibilities as something more than providing for their financial needs. They view other people as depending on them, whether co-workers, employers, or customers. This is a healthy way to view one’s vocation. There has recently been a lot of talk about “essential businesses”; but in view of the preceding, most businesses serve a very valuable role in society, a role that extends well beyond the primary goods and services they provide.

That said, such responsibilities pale when compared with the things of the Lord. When Jesus called disciples, saying, “Follow me,” they immediately laid aside their work responsibilities to follow the Lord (Matt. 4:18-22; Luke 5:27-28). For doing this, Jesus promised them numerous blessings in this life, “and in the world to come eternal life” (Mark 10:28-30).

Your ties with friends and family are not more important than your salvation. Parents, children, spouse, and friends are all tremendous blessings from the Lord, to be cherished and savored (Psa. 103:13; 127:3; Prov. 18:22; 17:17; 27:9). Yet Jesus warns, “He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me” (Matt. 10:37).

The threat of disease is not more important than your salvation. Disease brings misery to lives, as well as painful early death. But consider the words of encouragement Jesus gave His apostles: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell” (Matt. 10:28). Losing an eye or bodily limb in this life is far better than losing one’s soul for eternity (Mark 9:43-48). When compared with the Judgment to come, powerful persecutors and devastating diseases are mere gnats in our existence.

Your nation’s security is not more important than your salvation. Many brave souls have died for our national security, and those are sacrifices never to be taken lightly. However, one sacrifice was given greater than all those combined: Jesus Christ “gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father” (Gal. 1:4). Christ’s sacrifice did not deliver us from wicked political powers, such as the Assyrians, the Nazis, or the Soviets. He died to deliver us entirely from this present evil world, “that he might redeem us from all iniquity” (Titus 2:14), “to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him” (Heb. 7:25); and, as a result, Christians “are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all” (Heb. 10:10).

No, nothing is more important than your salvation. “It is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment” (Heb. 9:27). Financial security, job performance, and family or friendly ties will not prevent death’s eventual arrival, much less that of Christ’s Judgment. At that time no one will be lamenting diseases he suffered in life or breaches of national security. All that will matter from that point and eternity following is that we are found saved and faithful in Jesus Christ.

Will you be?

   Send article as PDF   

Author: Editor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.